Tag Archives: IR signals

Sending long AC Signals from Flash with IRremote

One of the most popular projects involving Infrared remote control, is to use an Arduino to control an Air conditioner (AC) system. However, AC signals are usually very long and take up a lot of SRAM on a standard Arduino. Experienced users will go about reverse engineering the AC protocol to make the sketch fit within the 2K Bytes of SRAM. Many hobbyists will struggle, even with the help of tools like AnalysIR to guide them. In this post we cover sending long AC Signals from Flash with IRremote. IRremote (along with IRLib) is a popular open-source library for sending and receiving IR remote control signals with Arduino. The demo code covered in this sketch extends our previous sendRAW example by demonstrating how to store many long AC signals in Flash with little or no SRAM overhead.

AnalysIR screen-shot showing the signals captured from the sendRAW_Flash sketch
AnalysIR screen-shot showing the signals captured from the sendRAW_Flash sketch (click or more detail)

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Troubleshooting the Big Button Infrared remote control with AnalysIR

Marco is  a volunteer for an organization (NSW Australia) that builds custom aids for people with disability, and has recently been looking at a project to create a ‘very large button’ IR remote control for a cable TV Set Top Box (STB). The custom unit needed basic functions (Channel Up/Down, Volume Up/Down and Power On/Off). Commercially available large button remotes have buttons that are still too small and/or they have too many buttons. Soon he hit a roadblock trying to capture some difficult Foxtel signals and searched all over the web looking for a solution. Needless to say, nothing worked out for him until he came across AnalysIR via Google. Once he started Troubleshooting the Big Button Infrared remote control with AnalysIR the root cause of his problems became obvious.

Troubleshooting the Big Button Infrared remote control with AnalysIR
Marco’s Big Button Infrared Remote control

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Backdoor uPWM Hack on Photon for Infrared signals using UART

Since we received our Photon several months ago it has been difficult to find a working example of Hardware PWM on the Photon. Initially, we ported our softPWM approach to the Photon, which is excellent. However, we figured it must be possible to use at least one of the spare UARTs on the Photon to achieve our goal. So first we started prototyping on the Arduino and quickly got a working example with some limitations – only 40 kHz and 33 kHz carrier frequencies were possible with the UART without delving into the registers a bit more. Then we moved the code over to the Photon, leveraging our previous softPWM examples, upgraded with the Arduino code – EUREKA! The Backdoor uPWM Hack on Photon for Infrared signals.

uPWM Circuit diagram for Photon
uPWM Circuit diagram for Photon using UART

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Porting AnalysIR firmware to Particle’s Photon platform

We have just completed porting our (single source) firmware from a range of other ‘Arduino’ type platforms to Particle’s Photon, having received it yesterday & thought it would be useful sharing some of our experiences for other ‘newbies’. The photon is one of a breed of modern IoT devices hitting the market at relatively low cost. It features a STM32F205 120Mhz ARM Cortex M3 processor running at 120MHz with 1MB flash, 128KB RAM and the all important WiFi. We have been wanting to support the previous Spark Core ($39), but couldn’t resist this little device at the low price point. Particle are also offering a similar embedded device in larger quantities of 10+,  for $12, including FCC certification.

Photon from Particle.io along with embedded sibling
Photon from Particle.io along with embedded sibling

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Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino, Part 2- RAW IR Signals

In Part 1 of this series, we demonstrated how to send signals using simple Infrared PWM on Arduino. In this Part 2 post we look at sending RAW IR signals – specifically a RAW NEC signal and a longer RAW Mitsubishi Air Conditioner signal. We have also improved the method shown in Part 1 due to some issues we identified when sending ‘real’ signals versus the ‘test’ signal we used before. (More on that later). In Part 3, we will take the signals from this post and show how to send them using their binary (or Hex) representation, which saves lots of SRAM.

Original NEC 32-bit and Mitsubishi 88-bit Signals displayed using AnalysIR
Original NEC 32-bit and Mitsubishi 88-bit Signals displayed using AnalysIR

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Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino

We are often asked on discussion boards, about conflicts between IRremote or IRLib and other Arduino Libraries. In this post, we present a sketch for ‘Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino’. This is the first part in a 3 part series of posts. Part 1 shows how to generate the Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino (AKA carrier frequency), using any available IO pin and without conflicting with other libraries. Part 2 will show how to send a RAW infrared signal using this approach and Part 3 will show how to send a common NEC signal from the binary or HEX value.

Example 56kHz generated Infrared signal @ 50% duty cycle
Example 56 kHz generated Infrared signal @ 50% duty cycle

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Poor maker’s Infrared receiver #2

Our recent post about the silver bullet IR receiver proved very popular and we promised that we would follow-up with another variant of the poor maker’s Infrared receiver. This time we are using an IR Led (emitter), 2 resistors and any standard Arduino. You will also need to download the Arduino code provided below, compile and upload it. One of the most common problems encountered when trying to decode IR signals is that makers don’t always have the appropriate IR receiver for the job in hand or have to wait for one to be delivered by mail. Here we present an affordable method to allow you to use any IR emitter (LED) as a receiver and as a bonus we are publishing the Arduino code to make it all work.

Circuit Diagram: Poor maker's IR Receiver
Circuit Diagram: Poor maker’s IR Receiver

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‘Silver bullet’ – the Oscilloscope Infrared Receiver

A while ago we came across a website on infrared remote controls which suggested a simple way to view IR signals using an Oscilloscope. The idea is to use a standard IR Led mounted into a BNC/RCA plug using a spare channel  making an Oscilloscope infrared receiver. So we set about ordering the connectors, which arrived in the post today. Another way of looking at this device is as a ‘poor-mans’ IR receiver, but if you have an Oscilloscope to plug it into then maybe you are not so poor after all.

 

Silver Bullet - Infrared Receiver connected to Channel 1
Silver Bullet – Infrared Receiver connected to Channel 1

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Infrared Receivers – signal lag and distortion

Many electronics enthusiasts will be familiar with how Infrared receivers demodulate IR signals. In this post we show a visualisation of the time lag and distortion of the signals as they pass through the IR receiver for demodulation and noise filtering.  Most DIY projects use the raw timings from the IR receiver to decode individual signals. However, not many will be aware that IR receivers can distort the signal timings by significant amounts. Fortunately, common IR decoders take this into account and compensate for timing distortions introduced by infrared demodulators / receivers.

Infrared Signal, Modulated & De-modulated
Infrared Signal, Modulated & De-modulated

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Air Conditioners: Recording long Infrared Remote control signals with Arduino

Recently we have been helping several members on the Arduino forum to record and playback their remote control signals from their Air Conditioners. These signals are typically much longer than those of TVs or common media devices. The 2 most popular libraries for Arduino, IRremote & IRlib are excellent, but have some limitations which we have covered in a previous post. In this post we address one particular issue that is proving challenging to users.

airconremote
Long Infrared signals prove challenging for Arduino users

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