Tag Archives: Arduino

Preview: A.IR Shield ESP8266/ESP32 Tx, a high-end IR Shield

A.IR Shield ESP8266/ESP32 Tx for AnalysIR with IR Blasters

The latest member of our MakeIR series of devices & kits is the A.IR Shield ESP8266/ESP32 Tx. This shield works out of the box with AnalysIR and is essentially plug & play, with additional custom Firmware options. This shield is a ‘sibling’ to our related TRx shield, and features IR multi-send only vs the send & receive of the TRx shield. The shield plugs into a Wemos D1 Mini (ESP8266) with headers or any pin-compatible clone (e.g. ESP32 Mini D1). Although designed specifically for AnalysIR, users can also upload any sketches that run on the ESP for Infrared remote control projects by customising the included firmware. A.IR Shield ESP8266/ESP32 Tx is built with only the highest quality IR components available and boasts dual Infrared emitters with configurable IR Power. The supplied firmware uniquely supports hardware PWM for sending IR signals (on ESP8266). Continue reading Preview: A.IR Shield ESP8266/ESP32 Tx, a high-end IR Shield

Preview: A.IR Shield ESP8266 TRx, a high-end IR Shield

The latest member of our MakeIR series of devices & kits is the A.IR Shield ESP8266 TRx.

A.IR Shield ESP8266 TRx with Wemos D1 Mini

This shield works out of the box with AnalysIR and is essentially plug & play, with additional custom Firmware options. The shield plugs into a Wemos D1 Mini (ESP8266) with headers or any pin-compatible clone. Although designed specifically for AnalysIR, users can also upload any sketches that run on the Wemos for Infrared remote control projects by customising the included firmware. A.IR Shield ESP8266 TRx is built with only the highest quality IR components available and boasts dual Infrared emitters with configurable IR Power. The supplied firmware uniquely supports hardware PWM for sending IR signals.

A.IR Shield block diagram ESP8266 TRx
A.IR Shield block diagram ESP8266 TRx

We have provided a link below to the product data sheet and would welcome feedback on additional, nice to have or missing features, if any. Please read the data sheet for a more detailed description of the A.IR ESP8266 TRx shield. The shield is now available to purchase via our web shop.

A.IR Shield ESP8266 TRx Wemos D1 Mini sidebyside
A.IR Shield ESP8266 TRx Wemos D1 Mini side-by-side

Custom Firmware

Although designed to work with AnalysIR, users can customise the provided firmware to send and receive IR signals via web requests, thus making integration into projects easy. More advanced users can integrate into platforms like Alexa or similar.

Also check out our example for creating your own IR send sketch for a variety of Signals (Air Conditioner, HEX, RAW & protocol based) using this shield with a Wemos D1 Mini or any ESP8266.

Continue reading Preview: A.IR Shield ESP8266 TRx, a high-end IR Shield

Sending long AC Signals from Flash with IRremote

One of the most popular projects involving Infrared remote control, is to use an Arduino to control an Air conditioner (AC) system. However, AC signals are usually very long and take up a lot of SRAM on a standard Arduino. Experienced users will go about reverse engineering the AC protocol to make the sketch fit within the 2K Bytes of SRAM. Many hobbyists will struggle, even with the help of tools like AnalysIR to guide them. In this post we cover sending long AC Signals from Flash with IRremote. IRremote (along with IRLib) is a popular open-source library for sending and receiving IR remote control signals with Arduino. The demo code covered in this sketch extends our previous sendRAW example by demonstrating how to store many long AC signals in Flash with little or no SRAM overhead.

AnalysIR screen-shot showing the signals captured from the sendRAW_Flash sketch
AnalysIR screen-shot showing the signals captured from the sendRAW_Flash sketch (click or more detail)

Continue reading Sending long AC Signals from Flash with IRremote

Troubleshooting the Big Button Infrared remote control with AnalysIR

Marco is  a volunteer for an organization (NSW Australia) that builds custom aids for people with disability, and has recently been looking at a project to create a ‘very large button’ IR remote control for a cable TV Set Top Box (STB). The custom unit needed basic functions (Channel Up/Down, Volume Up/Down and Power On/Off). Commercially available large button remotes have buttons that are still too small and/or they have too many buttons. Soon he hit a roadblock trying to capture some difficult Foxtel signals and searched all over the web looking for a solution. Needless to say, nothing worked out for him until he came across AnalysIR via Google. Once he started Troubleshooting the Big Button Infrared remote control with AnalysIR the root cause of his problems became obvious.

Troubleshooting the Big Button Infrared remote control with AnalysIR
Marco’s Big Button Infrared Remote control

Continue reading Troubleshooting the Big Button Infrared remote control with AnalysIR

Backdoor uPWM Hack on Arduino for Infrared signals using UART

In this blog post we follow up on our recent article about generation of infrared PWM from the Photon’s UART where we suggested that it may be possible to achieve something similar with the Arduino. In our previous attempt the Arduino was only able to generate PWM at 40 kHz and 33 kHz using the same approach. After some investigations we discovered a new approach which provides an even better set of results using the Arduino’s USART. Yes, we were able to generate 30, 33, 36, 38, 40 , 56 and surprisingly the illusive 455 kHz which was not possible on the Photon (using this approach). Read on for the details. Readers should also study our original series of articles on ‘softPWM‘ for a better understanding of the source code which can be downloaded below.

Arduino uPWM Circuit Diagram
Arduino uPWM Circuit Diagram

Continue reading Backdoor uPWM Hack on Arduino for Infrared signals using UART

Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino, Part 2- RAW IR Signals

In Part 1 of this series, we demonstrated how to send signals using simple Infrared PWM on Arduino. In this Part 2 post we look at sending RAW IR signals – specifically a RAW NEC signal and a longer RAW Mitsubishi Air Conditioner signal. We have also improved the method shown in Part 1 due to some issues we identified when sending ‘real’ signals versus the ‘test’ signal we used before. (More on that later). In Part 3, we will take the signals from this post and show how to send them using their binary (or Hex) representation, which saves lots of SRAM.

Original NEC 32-bit and Mitsubishi 88-bit Signals displayed using AnalysIR
Original NEC 32-bit and Mitsubishi 88-bit Signals displayed using AnalysIR

Continue reading Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino, Part 2- RAW IR Signals

Latest release of AnalysIR V1 preview #2 is now available for download

Dublin, Ireland – 17th April 2015. We are happy to announce the latest release of AnalysIR V1 preview #2 is now available for download by our backers & supporters. Existing users of AnalysIR will receive an email with instructions on how to download this version. New users will receive the details as part of the registration process.

AnalysIR Screenshot
AnalysIR Screenshot

A major highlight of this release is full AnalysIR support for our soon to be released LearnIR (IR Learner). LearnIR delivers the best performance available for receiving and sending Infrared signals with excellent accuracy.

View the AnalysIR Product Sheet(PDF)

We would like to extend a big thanks to the many users around the world who have helped with feature requests, new protocols and testing over the last months.

Some Highlights in this latest release include:

Continue reading Latest release of AnalysIR V1 preview #2 is now available for download

Reverse engineering the Mitsubishi AC Infrared protocol

This post is the second in a two-part series about Reverse Engineering AC Infrared protocols. This time we look at the Mitsubishi Air Conditioner IR Protocol. The project was undertaken by  two of our users in France (Vincent & Mathieu), with the help of AnalysIR, who  collaborated to reverse engineer this Mitsubishi and previously the Panasonic AC Infrared protocol, both examples of the more challenging AC Infrared protocols. Not only did they identify the individual field codes & checksum but also provided some impressive documentation. Detailed information is available via GitHub which is linked below. This 288 data bit Mitsubishi AC Infrared protocol is composed of two consecutive frames. Both frames are always identical for each signal sent. In common with most AC units the complete settings are sent with every IR signal (temperature, fan, swing etc…). AnalysIR was used to record and turn the signal into HEX/Binary format from which the reverse engineering of the individual fields was tackled.

Mitsubishi AC AnalysIR Screenshot
Mitsubishi AC AnalysIR Screenshot

Continue reading Reverse engineering the Mitsubishi AC Infrared protocol

Reverse engineering the Panasonic AC Infrared protocol

Recently, two of our users in France (Vincent & Mathieu) collaborated to reverse engineer the Panasonic AC Infrared protocol, one of the more challenging AC Infrared protocols using AnalysIR. Not only did they identify the codes & checksum but also provided some impressive documentation and full source code to help others. Detailed information is available via GitHub which is linked below. This 216 data bit Panasonic AC Infrared protocol is composed of two consecutive frames. The first frame remains constant for every command sent to the AC unit. In common with most AC units the complete configuration is sent with every IR signal (temperature, fan, swing etc…). AnalysIR was used to record and turn the signal into HEX/Binary format from which the reverse engineering of the individual fields was tackled.

AnalysIR - Panasonic AC 216 bit Infrared signal
AnalysIR – Panasonic AC 216 bit Infrared signal

Continue reading Reverse engineering the Panasonic AC Infrared protocol

AnalysIR supports PSOC 4 from Cypress

AnalysIR now provides support for the PSOC 4 Prototyping kit from Cypress. Effective immediately users of AnalysIR can use the kit to act as an Infrared source for AnalysIR. The PSOC 4 Prototyping kits are available from Cypress and via their global distributors for just US$4 plus shipping. To use the kit with AnalysIR you will also need an IR Receiver and an optional IR Learner, which can also be purchased with AnalysIR. Initially, the PSOC Firmware is available on request and will be included as part of the installation package in a future release.

PSOC4 and AnalysIR
PSOC4 and AnalysIR

Continue reading AnalysIR supports PSOC 4 from Cypress