Tag Archives: Vishay

LearnIR Version 2 announced

LearnIR Version 2  - advanced Infrared Learner for remote control
LearnIR Version 2 – advanced Infrared Learner for remote control

We are excited to announce the Availability of LearnIR Version 2. LearnIR is now positioned as the most advanced Infrared learner for remote control available worldwide and comes at a fraction of the price of its closest competitors. It is available for pre-order now and will start shipping before the end of February 2020. LearnIR V2 is a major upgrade to the previous version with greatly improved firmware and an optional enclosure. It comes with the companion LearnIR Windows application which has also seen some improvements over the previous version. Our new and unique FUZZY Clean technology is included for the first time. The clear enclosure is in a compact and portable thumb-drive form factor and can be attached to a key-ring, lanyard or similar. LearnIR Version 2 also feature an improved micro-controller which allows for future updates and upgrades. Check out the Product Datasheet here. Like all of our Modules is also supported by our flagship application AnalysIR.

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Updated ESP8266 NodeMCU Backdoor uPWM Hack for IR signals

In our previous post we showed how to generate stable IR carrier signals using the ESP8266 NodeMCU module. A feature of the original approach was that the output IR signal was inverted and required some additional circuitry to invert it again before transmission. Since the original post we have figured out a method to output a non-inverted or standard IR signal thus removing the need for the additional circuitry. This is achieved by using what turned out to be a very simple setting hidden deep in the ESP8266 UART registers which is covered below. Like all simple solutions it also threw up some other quirks of the ESP8266 NodeMCU, which were eventually overcome with the addition of a simple resistor. The Updated ESP8266 NodeMCU Backdoor uPWM Hack for IR signals is detailed below – including updated source firmware, new circuit diagram and explanation of the ‘quirk’. Read on….

Esp8266 NodeMCU and MakeIR SendIR module from AnalysIR
ESP8266 NodeMCU and MakeIR SendIR module from AnalysIR

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Troubleshooting the Big Button Infrared remote control with AnalysIR

Marco is  a volunteer for an organization (NSW Australia) that builds custom aids for people with disability, and has recently been looking at a project to create a ‘very large button’ IR remote control for a cable TV Set Top Box (STB). The custom unit needed basic functions (Channel Up/Down, Volume Up/Down and Power On/Off). Commercially available large button remotes have buttons that are still too small and/or they have too many buttons. Soon he hit a roadblock trying to capture some difficult Foxtel signals and searched all over the web looking for a solution. Needless to say, nothing worked out for him until he came across AnalysIR via Google. Once he started Troubleshooting the Big Button Infrared remote control with AnalysIR the root cause of his problems became obvious.

Troubleshooting the Big Button Infrared remote control with AnalysIR
Marco’s Big Button Infrared Remote control

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Preview: A.IR Shield Nano, a high-end Infrared Shield for AnalysIR, IRremote & IRLib

The fifth member of our MakeIR series of devices & kits is the A.IR Shield Nano. This shield works out of the box with AnalysIR and is essentially plug & play , with additional prototyping options. The shield comes attached to an Arduino nano compatible device (clone). Although designed specifically for AnalysIR, users can also upload IRremote, IRLib or any Arduino sketches that run on the Nano. A.IR shield is built with only the highest quality IR components available and boasts dual Infrared emitters with configurable IR Power.

A.IR block diagram
A.IR Shield Nano block diagram

We have provided a link below to the preliminary product data sheet and would welcome feedback on additional, nice to have or missing features, if any. Please read the data sheet for a more detailed description of the A.IR shield. Continue reading Preview: A.IR Shield Nano, a high-end Infrared Shield for AnalysIR, IRremote & IRLib

Infrared receiver showdown – TSOP34438 vs VS1838B winner revealed

Having helped many makers resolve problems with Infrared remote control projects over on the Arduino forum, we decided to put 2 of the more common 38kHz receivers, TSOP34438 vs VS1838B,  ‘head-to-head’ over 3 rounds in a winner takes all contest. Different people report a wide variety of problems when first attempting infrared remote control, resulting from using the wrong receiver to timer or interrupt conflicts between the various libraries available. Our commentary on the ‘face-off’ will hopefully shed some light on the ability of these 2 common Infrared receivers to deliver results, as expected.

Idle Interference on VS1838B
Idle Interference on VS1838B

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Preview: DetectIR, advanced infrared receiver

The fourth member of our MakeIR series of devices & kits will be DetectIR. This infrared receiver module can be configured for Visual IR signal detection, Serial over IR or as an Infrared receiver which can handle even the longest Air conditioner signals. DetectIR is built with only the highest quality IR components available.

DetectIR block diagram
DetectIR block diagram

We have provided a link below to the preliminary product data sheet and would welcome feedback on additional, nice to have or missing features, if any. Please read the datasheet for a more detailed description of DetectIR. Continue reading Preview: DetectIR, advanced infrared receiver

Poor maker’s Infrared receiver #2

Our recent post about the silver bullet IR receiver proved very popular and we promised that we would follow-up with another variant of the poor maker’s Infrared receiver. This time we are using an IR Led (emitter), 2 resistors and any standard Arduino. You will also need to download the Arduino code provided below, compile and upload it. One of the most common problems encountered when trying to decode IR signals is that makers don’t always have the appropriate IR receiver for the job in hand or have to wait for one to be delivered by mail. Here we present an affordable method to allow you to use any IR emitter (LED) as a receiver and as a bonus we are publishing the Arduino code to make it all work.

Circuit Diagram: Poor maker's IR Receiver
Circuit Diagram: Poor maker’s IR Receiver

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Infrared Receivers – signal lag and distortion

Many electronics enthusiasts will be familiar with how Infrared receivers demodulate IR signals. In this post we show a visualisation of the time lag and distortion of the signals as they pass through the IR receiver for demodulation and noise filtering.  Most DIY projects use the raw timings from the IR receiver to decode individual signals. However, not many will be aware that IR receivers can distort the signal timings by significant amounts. Fortunately, common IR decoders take this into account and compensate for timing distortions introduced by infrared demodulators / receivers.

Infrared Signal, Modulated & De-modulated
Infrared Signal, Modulated & De-modulated

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Arduino: 10 common pitfalls with Infrared Remote Control

Arduino: 10 common pitfalls with Infrared Remote Control
Arduino: 10 common pitfalls with Infrared Remote Control

Over the last few months we have been regular contributors to the Arduino and other forums, answering questions about Infrared remote control projects. It became apparent that beginners typically trip up on many common ‘pitfalls’. So we decided to list off our ‘Top 10’.

 

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Custom TV remote control using Arcade style console

  Following on from our previous blog post about SKY+ RC6 IR codes, we have now completed the project and are about to ship to its new owner – a friend of ours.

SR1We purchased a Sega megadrive Arcade style games console which was BNIB for €25 ($35) and disabled all of the built-in gaming functionality. We then wired up each of the 12 available switches (Joystick & Arcade style buttons) to the Arduino Nano which was placed onto an Arduino prototyping shield and mounted to the enclosure using ‘lots’ of hot glue. Note some of these consoles come with an additional 2 buttons, which can bring the total to 14. In addition, the joystick has 8 positions in total of which we used only 4 as it would be too difficult for the user to manage all eight. Continue reading Custom TV remote control using Arcade style console