Tag Archives: RPi

Teensy now supported for AnalysIR

A new user of AnalysIR from the Netherlands, wanted to get the AnalysIR firmware working on Teensy 3.x . Although this has not been officially supported, we were happy to support his efforts knowing that it would most likely be a relatively easy exercise, based on past experiences. Needless to say, he was successful in decoding Infrared signals with AnalysIR within a short space of time. Prompted by his interest, we ordered our own Teensy 3.1 to add to our growing collection of 40+ MCUs and although Teensy support is in beta for now, it will be oficially supported for AnalysIR from our next release. In the meantime, users of AnalysIR can just contact us for a copy of the Teensy sketch (firmware).

Teensy 3.1 now supported for AnalysIR
Teensy 3.1 now supported for AnalysIR

Teensy 3.x now joins a long list of devices supported for use with AnalysIR, including: Continue reading Teensy now supported for AnalysIR

Latest ‘New Year’ release of AnalysIR with full support for USB IR Toy and more.

Dublin, Ireland – 31st January 2014. We are happy to announce the latest ‘New Year’ release of AnalysIR to all our backers & supporters. Since the completion of the crowd-funding campaign on Indiegogo we have added over 125 updates and enhancements to AnalysIR, with more to come.

AnalysIR Screenshot
AnalysIR Screenshot

A major highlight of this release is full AnalysIR support for USB IR Toy from Dangerous Prototypes (V1 & V2 hardware) for decoding and resending IR signals at all common modulation frequencies. In our opinion, AnalysIR is now the premier GUI supporting DP’s IR toy, not to mention the Arduino, RPi, MSP430 F5529 LaunchPad (beta)  and more. A selection of enhancements in this latest release, include: Continue reading Latest ‘New Year’ release of AnalysIR with full support for USB IR Toy and more.

Testing AnalysIR with a custom PCB

Here are some photos we captured, of a sample of our MCU test rigs and custom PCB for AnalysIR.

AnalysIRtestrigs
A sample of our test rigs for AnalysIR

The photo above shows some of our test setup for Arduino, Raspberry Pi, TI MSP430 LaunchPad and the (big) baby of them all the USB IR Toy. The small red custom PCBs are ones we had made via Elecrow which worked out great. So instead of just using  solderless breadboards we now plug these ‘half shields’ directly into the Arduino header, or in the case of the RPi using a ribbon cable. The USB IR Toy already has the IR receivers on board and doesn’t require this PCB.

We should also be able to hook up the LaunchPad to this board using headers. So once we receive the full set of headers, we ordered on-line, we will have all our test setups much neater and more reliable. Previously, we used solderless breadboards, as can be seen in the photo attached to the LaunchPad. Continue reading Testing AnalysIR with a custom PCB

AnalysIR integrated support for USB IR Toy

Dangerous Protoypes
USB IR Toy V2 from Dangerous Prototypes (via Seedstudio)

We received a V2 USB IR Toy last week from Dangerous Prototypes via Seedstudio.
(See early access note for backers below)

After some initial teething problems we set about playing with this new device. Then we went about trying to integrate it into AnalysIR. We found that operating the IR Toy in ‘Sampling Mode’ worked best for our needs. There are several other modes available which are described on the website below. Continue reading AnalysIR integrated support for USB IR Toy

Update: AnalysIR Phase 1 roll-out, Arduino Due

Just a quick update to let you know how things are progressing with the phase 1 roll-out.

Today we have issued our 2nd release to the initial participants which includes 22 updates and fixes to AnalysIR plus many other updates to the User Guide. AnalysIR has benefited greatly from the feedback received with a bonus of more features added.

We have recently received an Arduino DUE and have succeeded in porting our existing Arduino code to this new device. The porting was surprisingly quick and very few changes were required, which is all credit to the Arduino Team for making it so easy for us. The DUE code will be merged into our release cycle sometime over the next month or so.

So far we have had mainly positive results on the Arduino platform. However, the Raspberry Pi platform (RPi) is presenting more challenges than anticipated. The good news is that we believe we have a workaround for RPi and we will work on resolving any trailing issues over the next weeks. Another aspect of the RPi roll-out is that it requires greater knowledge of things such as Linux, networking and compiling on the RPi for users. We will put some thought and effort into trying to simplify this experience – but this may take more time than anticipated. Arduino is just so easy to use…..

At this time, we would also like to open up the phase 1 roll-out to another 10 backers on a first come basis. So the first 10 emails to arrive in our inbox, from backers, will receive an invitation. You can use the IGG message feature for this or just email info@A?????IR.com (replace the A?????IR with our name). To participate you will need an Arduino or RPi and an IR receiver and of course time.

At this point we still expect to release AnalysIR to all backers in or around Sep 30th.

Finally, many thanks again for all your support and patience.

Update: AnalysIR network enabled, Kits, RPi, Yún

The first set of kits has shipped today and because we were able to get a discount on the components we also included some bonus components as a gift (2 x npn transistors, 4 x 100 ohm resistors & 4 x 4k7 ohm resistors). These extra components may be of use to those who want to build their own IR led Driver circuit with the TSAL6100. We didn’t realise that shipping components was such an ordeal (individual Customs & Air Safety declarations depending on destination). The shipping cost was more than budgeted, but was also offset by the discount achieved.

On the Raspberry Pi front, AnalysIR is now running well without any noticeable glitches. The approach we have adapted is to connect to the RPi over the network. The solution was to pipe the output over the LAN to a virtual serial port on the Windows PC. The virtual serial port utility is freely available for Windows and the network stuff on the RPi is just standard shell commands. I should point out that we haven’t yet tried to measure the modulation frequency on the RPi, just straight decoding though the IR Receiver. When idle we are using only 1.3% CPU on the RPi, when recording a single signal it goes to 1.6% CPU & when full out recording IR it goes up to ~ 4.9% CPU usage. This is pretty good as it doesn’t impact on other processes; considering our first attempt was using 99% CPU when idle 🙂

The potential to decode & analyze over a network may lead to some interesting features in future – ideas welcome. As a minimum, the work with the RPi will make the port to the Arduino Due easier (we are expecting a Due next week) and also when the Arduino Yún is released with WiFi

Update: Campaign reaches 100 backers, RPi & News

We have now reached 100 unique backers for AnalysIR and we would like to thank you all for your generous support & welcome our latest backers. In particular, we would like to give a special thanks to those who made donations without perks.

And now for the News:

  • The components for the Starter Kits have arrived as expected; the envelopes are already printed with addresses taken from IGG & we plan to drop them off at the Post Office sometime on Monday. Hopefully, most people will have received them before AnalysIR is released to backers (circa: 9th September, which allows1 week after the campaign ends to eliminate as many glitches as possible). Remember, to get the full use of AnalysIR you will need the components in Kit A, as a minimum. However, just having an IR receiver is sufficient.(+ of course an Arduino).
    So far, everyone has chosen ‘Kit F’, which is probably a good idea.
  • Regarding the Raspberry Pi ‘stretch goal’, it looks like we may not reach this goal, based on the current trajectory. However, we decided to purchase a Pi with the IGG (aka your) funds released to date & it arrived yesterday. After a lot of ‘wasted’ time trying to get it set up without a display we eventually succeeded. So today we had a go at porting our Arduino code over to the RPi. For the initial attempt, we have decided to use the WiringPi library & we have good success so far. So here is an exported trace image of the first successful NEC IR signal decoded by AnalysIR from a Raspberry Pi.
    SignalTraceImage
    First successful NEC IR signal decoded by AnalysIR from a Raspberry Pi

    use CTRL+
    On the top you can see the same IR signal recorded directly by AnalysIR at the same time (via 2 different IR receivers – one connected to an Arduino & the other connected to an RPi pin)

  • We haven’t fully finished with the RPi coding yet & there are some minor glitches, but we are happy with it as a first attempt. At the moment we are using interrupts & are only dumping the information to a terminal screen via a network connection & then manually pasting the output into AnalysIR’s import facility. We have to do some further study to see how we can best get ‘serial’ data from the RPi to the Windows PC. The simple solution is to use a USB serial adapter connected to the Rx/Tx pins of the RPi, but given it already has an Ethernet port we are going to investigate if a more elegant solution is feasible.

That’s all for now……… Next week = Documentation update